The Novel That Must Not Be Named: A Clarification

Just to be ABUNDANTLY clear, because apparently someone who we have encountered before seems to think we are referencing her piece of fan-fiction and has issued a press release to indicate the same.  When Lori Joffs stated the following to MTV “About 90 percent of the fandom is just excited to have anything,” said Lori Joffs, co-creator of Twilight Lexicon. “It’s the small little bit of about 10 percent of fans who are interested in another story. The story that must not be named.” Said novel that Lori was referencing was Midnight Sun, which the Lexicon routinely, jokingly calls “Dark High Noon” or “The Novel That Must Not Be Named” in order for Stephenie Meyer not to see the title in print.  It’s an inside joke like in Harry Potter where if people say Voldemort they think it’s bad luck.  Lori wasn’t talking about a piece of fan-fiction that this adult woman  thinks she can publish for profit and make into a movie because she doesn’t like copyright laws and twists the law’s meaning to serve her own interpretation which is completely without legal merit or understanding.

Below is the FULL CONTEXT of Lori’s comments to MTV, which make it more than obvious that Lori and MTV reporter Terri Schwartz both knew that Lori was talking about Midnight Sun and nothing else.

“Amid the excitement over the announcement Tuesday morning (March 30) that Stephenie Meyer would be releasing a new “Twilight” novella, “The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner,” on June 5, some fans were upset that the book was not “Midnight Sun.” Twilighters shared their opinions with MTV News on Twitter and in the comments, and their reactions ranged from understanding to angry.

“About 90 percent of the fandom is just excited to have anything,” said Lori Joffs, co-creator of Twilight Lexicon. “It’s the small little bit of about 10 percent of fans who are interested in another story. The story that must not be named.”

The “Midnight Sun” controversy started back in August 2008 after half of the novel — a retelling of “Twilight” from Edward Cullen’s perspective — leaked onto the Web. Meyer made a statement on her blog saying she felt personally violated by the fact her work was leaked and that the novel was put on hold indefinitely.”

We are not linking to the offending party’s website because frankly we don’t want to give her any more publicity, but in case any news media picks up on her press release our position in this matter is there for them to see and we are not further misrepresented or misquoted.

We are also disallowing comments on this post because this is a clarification of what has always been our position on the matter and don’t wish to engage in a public debate.

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